Computational Brain Imaging Workshop 2016

MRI and EEG/MEG offer exciting opportunities to study the human brain in-vivo. However, the measurements are typically high-dimensional and noisy. Consequently, human neuroscience relies heavily on computational techniques from machine learning, statistics, signal processing and graph theory to process, analyze and yield scientific discoveries. The Computational Brain Imaging Workshop will feature cutting-edge research on human brain function, connectivity and disorders from local, as well as international speakers from Oxford, UCL and Harvard Medical School. 

The workshop will be held on May 6th (Friday) 2016, 11.30 to 17.30 at the CeLS auditorium at NUS (http://www.lsi.nus.edu.sg/corp/contact-us/). Due to generous funding by SINAPSE (http://www.sinapseinstitute.org/), the event is free. However, you must register for catering purpose (http://goo.gl/forms/BpyU7NIyA5). Capacity is limited to 100 people. If you have any questions about the event, please contact Gia (ngohoanggia@gmail.com).
 
Program
11.30 - 12.30 Lunch
12.30 - 12.40 Welcome
   
  Session 1: Computational Methods
Chair: Thomas Yeo
12.40 - 13.05 Jon Polimeni (Harvard Medical School): Exploring the biological limits of fMRI spatial and temporal resolution at 7 Tesla 
13.05 - 13.10 Q & A
13.10 - 13.35 Anastasios Bezerianos (National University of Singapore): Multifrequency and multimodal brain imaging in cognitive sciences
13.35 - 13.40 Q & A
13.40 - 14.05 Anastasia Yendiki (Harvard Medical School): Computational anatomy of the white matter with diffusion MRI
14.05 - 14.10 Q & A
14.10 - 14.35 Stephen Smith (University of Oxford): Analyses for big-data imaging studies
14.35 - 14.40 Q & A
   
14.40 - 15.10 Tea Break
   
  Session 2: Disease Applications 
Chair: Stephen Smith
15.10 - 15.35 Daniel Alexander (University College London): Microstructure imaging, disease progression modelling, and applications to dementia
15.35 - 15.40 Q & A
15.40 - 16.05 Juan Helen Zhou (Duke-NUS Medical School): Brain connectivity changes in healthy older adults and persons at-risk for psychosis: a longitudinal perspective
16.05 - 16.10 Q & A
16.10 - 16.35 Thomas Yeo (National University of Singapore): Hierarchical Bayesian models of brain function and disorder
16.35 - 16.40 Q & A
16.40 - 17.05 Justin Dauwels (Nanyang Technological University): Towards semi-automated and fully automated epileptic spike detection
17.05 - 17.10 Q & A
   
17.10 - 17.20 Wrap up and adjournment